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Sizzla 01
Miguel Orlando Collins (born 17 April 1976), known by his stage name Sizzla Kalonji or Sizzla, is a Jamaican reggae musician. He is one of the most commercially and critically successful contemporary reggae artists and is noted for his high number of releases. As of 2018 he has released 56 solo albums.

Sizzla began to develop his own style whilst serving his musical apprenticeship with the Caveman Hi-Fi sound system. He has used his music as a vehicle for his message, kickstarting his recording career in 1995 with a release through the Zagalou label, he then teamed up with "Bobby Digital" Dixon for a series of singles. Extensive touring with fellow Xterminator label mate roots and culture artist Luciano followed, earning Sizzla notoriety.

Homer Harris, the same man who named and mentored Buju Banton got him his first break, introduced Sizzla to top Jamaican saxophonist Dean Fraser, the musical director for Philip "Fattis" Burrell's Xterminator Family. 1995 marked an important turning point for Sizzla when he began working with Fattis. This union led to a run of successful singles and the release of Sizzla's debut album, Burning Up.... (Read more)

AllMusic said the following of him:

Emerging during the latter half of the '90s, the enormously prolific Sizzla was one of the leaders of the conscious dancehall movement. Along with Buju Banton and Capleton, he helped lead dancehall back to the musical and spiritual influence of roots reggae, favoring organic productions and heavily Rastafarian subject matter. A member of the militant Bobo Ashanti sect, he sometimes courted controversy with his strict adherence to their views, particularly his aggressive condemnations of homosexuals and white Western oppressors. Yet overall, his music was generally positive, advocating faith and compassion for poor black youth, and respect for women. He remained something of an enigma to the public at large, rarely granting interviews and keeping his concert appearances to a minimum. Nonetheless, he still ranked as arguably the most popular conscious reggae artist of his time, thanks to a normally high standard of quality control - all the more impressive given the frequency with which he recorded. A versatile singjay-style vocalist with a gruff, gravelly tone, he was capable of both rapid-fire chatting and powerful, melodic singing, and his best backing riddims were among the strongest in contemporary dancehall.

Links to Peel

Peel played Sizzla's material from his first appearances in collaboration with other reggae artists until nearly the end of his time on radio (made easier by the sheer volume of Sizzla's output). Although he was initially very taken with some tunes, others lost their sheen fairly quickly (viz. his comments on Like Mountain, although that did not stop him playing it again). He praised the collaborative track Competition In Fear, commenting that it sounded like a football record (no doubt a feeling enhanced by the World Cup in 1998). In 2003, These Are The Days was selected for a Peel's Record Box listing.

Festive Fifty Entries

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    Sizzla These Are The Day's

    Sizzla These Are The Day's

Sessions

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Other Shows Played

1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2003

Others

External Links